Lynne Friedli and Robert Stearn – Positive Affect as Coercive Strategy: Conditionality, Activation and the Role of Psychology in UK Government Workfare Programmes

William Viney writes – This is the fifth and final post introducing individual papers from a special issue of Medical Humanities, edited by myself, Felicity Callard, and Angela Woods. A more general overview of the special issue can be found here. In the last contribution to this special issue, Lynne Friedli and Robert Stearn reflect the Read the full article…

Published Today: ‘Critical Medical Humanities’, a special issue of BMJ’s Medical Humanities

It is with great pleasure that we announce the publication of a special issue of Medical Humanities journal, edited by Centre for Medical Humanities researchers William Viney, Felicity Callard, and Angela Woods. Exploring the many valences of the word ‘critical’ across and beyond the medical humanities, the special collection champions a ‘critical medical humanities’ characterised Read the full article…

Whistle While You Work (For Nothing): Positive Affect as Coercive Strategy – The Case of Workfare

In this post, Lynne Friedli and Robert Stearn look at the role of  psychological coercion, notably through the imposition of positive affect,  in UK Government workfare programmes. There has been little or no debate about the recruitment of psychology/psychologists into monitoring,  modifying and/or punishing  people who claim social security benefits. This silence raises important ethical questions, Read the full article…