Reviewer needed: ‘The Brain and the Meaning of Life’ by Paul Thagard

We are pleased to offer Paul Thagard’s exciting book ‘The Brain and the Meaning of Life’ (Princeton University Press, 2012) for review. Expressions of interest from all angles of the medical humanities are welcome, but this book may be particularly well suited to those with an interest in philosophy. ‘Why is life worth living? What Read the full article…

Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society: a postgraduate conference (CfP, Conference, London, 14 June 2014)

Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society: a postgraduate conference Centre for Psychoanalysis Middlesex University, London Saturday, 14 June, 2014 We invite postgraduate students and research fellows to submit proposals for papers on psychoanalysis or psychoanalytically informed research. Papers may be from any academic discipline, including psychology, sociology, cultural studies, psychosocial studies, history, literature, art, religious studies or Read the full article…

Memory and Mind: Perspectives from Philosophy and Neuroscience (Applications Open for ECE Summer School, 7-20 Sept 2014)

Memory and Mind: Perspectives from Philosophy and Neuroscience ECE Summer School at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany 7 Sept – 20 Sept 2014 We invite applications for participation at the European Campus of Excellence (ECE) Summer School on Memory and Mind: an interdisciplinary course, integrating the fields of philosophy, neuroscience, psychology, computer science and medicine. Deadline: Read the full article…

The Cultural History of Exhaustion – Review

This review of the Exhaustion conference appeared on the fantastic Sleep Cultures blog: “On 25 October 2013, the University of Kent hosted a one-day interdisciplinary conference on exhaustion, organized by Anna Katharina Schaffner (Comparative Literature, Kent) and funded by the Wellcome Trust, that brought together scholars from the arts, medicine, sociology, psychology, literary studies and Read the full article…

Whistle While You Work (For Nothing): Positive Affect as Coercive Strategy – The Case of Workfare

In this post, Lynne Friedli and Robert Stearn look at the role of  psychological coercion, notably through the imposition of positive affect,  in UK Government workfare programmes. There has been little or no debate about the recruitment of psychology/psychologists into monitoring,  modifying and/or punishing  people who claim social security benefits. This silence raises important ethical questions, Read the full article…

Fear and Loathing: Phobia in Literature and Culture (CfP, Conference, Kent, 9-10 May 2014)

Fear and Loathing: Phobia in Literature and Culture Centre for Gender, Sexuality and Writing, School of English, University of Kent, 9th-10th May 2014 Focusing on the literary and historical representation of irrational emotions or phobias, Fear and Loathing seeks papers on topics and authors from any period, which aim to demonstrate the extent to which Read the full article…

Special Issue on Narrative Health Psychology (CfP, Deadline: 31st March 2014)

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Narrative Health Psychology for the Journal of Health Psychology Guest editors: Michael Murray, Anneke Sools, and Gerben Westerhof Although stories and storytelling have been an intrinsic part of psychology since the emergence of the discipline, a narrative approach became more prominently and explicitly articulated in the 1980s. This early Read the full article…

Exhaustion (One day workshop, University of Kent, Friday 25 October 2013)

Exhaustion Friday, 25 October, Cathedral Lodge, Canterbury Funded by the Wellcome Trust Organised by Anna Katharina Schaffner This interdisciplinary conference explores different medical, psychological and socio-political narratives on the origins of and cures for exhaustion. Experts from diverse disciplines (including psychiatrists, psychologists, social scientists, occupational health specialists, literary scholars and filmmakers) will talk about different Read the full article…

Paul Moloney, The Therapy Industry – Review by Jenny Laws

Jenny Laws, post-doctoral research fellow at the Centre for Medical Humanities and Department of Geography, Durham University, reviews Paul Moloney, The Therapy Industry: The Irresistible Rise Of The Talking Cure, And Why It Doesn’t Work (London: Pluto Press, 2013). You can download a sample of the book here. Many thanks to Pluto Press for permission Read the full article…

Storytelling and the Sciences of Mind: Toward a Transdisciplinary Approach

David Herman writes: I feel very fortunate indeed to be joining the Department of English Studies at Durham University, which is chock full of brilliant scholars doing cutting-edge research and teaching. Equally pathbreaking work is being done under the auspices of Durham’s Centre for Medical Humanities, so I am doubly honored to have this opportunity Read the full article…