Creative Summit: Translating Chronic Pain (Sat 21 Oct 2017, Lancaster University)

Creative Summit: Writing Pain, Moments and Fragments Lancaster University, Saturday 21 October, 9.20-5.30 This is the first event on the AHRC-funded project Translating Chronic Pain. This Summit brings 25 people together, including academics, pain charities and people living with chronic pain, to explore how short-form creative writing may support people living with chronic pain, raise awareness, and enhance Read the full article…

Feel It Festival: Exploring Pain & Breath Through Performance (Public Engagement, University of Bristol, 17-20 November 2016)

From the 17th to 20th of November 2016 the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute for Health Research and the Life of Breath project will bring together researchers, artists and members of the public to debate and explore University of Bristol research on the experience of being human; in particular pain and breathlessness. The weekend-long Feel It Festival will see Read the full article…

‘What the Body Commands: The Imperative Theory of Pain’ reviewed by Emily Underwood-Lee

What the Body Commands: The Imperative Theory of Pain by Colin Klein (MIT, 2015) In this book Colin Klein presents us with a rigorously constructed, well written and witty argument where he proposes that imperativism is a cogent framework for refiguring pain. He sets out his stall as an imperativist and gives a chronicle of Read the full article…

Encountering Pain (Conference, University College London, 1-2 July, 2016)

Pain is notoriously difficult to communicate. Some academics have argued that pain resists description in language while others claim that it can generate language. By bringing into dialogue people who experience, witness, and treat pain, this conference seeks to explore alternative means of communicating, sharing and assessing suffering. How do we respond when we encounter Read the full article…

‘Pain: A Political History’ reviewed by Dr Anastasia Kucharski

‘Pain: A Political History’ by Keith Wailoo (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014) In Pain: A Political History Keith Wailoo surveys American social legislation since World War II in terms of its impact on people who experience pain. To organise his narrative he divides politicians and advocates in two groups: those who prefer self-sufficiency and minimal Read the full article…

Fully-Funded PhD Studentship in French and the Medical Humanities at Nottingham Trent University

PhD Studentship in French Literature/Culture (including cinema) with a focus on the Medical Humanities. Proposals investigating the following areas within this field are particularly welcome: representations of illness; disease; pain; trauma; disability; old age; mourning; care/caring/carer. A background in literary/critical theory is helpful. Specific qualifications include a 2:1 in French and an MA/MRes in French Read the full article…

Pain: An Interdisciplinary Conference (University at Bufffalo, SUNY, Oct. 8-10, 2015)

Pain has always constituted a central human experience. Yet recently the stakes involved in discussions of pain have become particularly high. We can see this in recent debates about torture, war, and the death penalty; discussions of the politics of representing, historicizing, and describing pain; changes in medical and alternative approaches to both chronic and Read the full article…

Reviewer needed: ‘All in Your Head: Making Sense of Pediatric Pain’ by Mara Buchbinder

We are pleased to offer for review ‘All in Your Head: Making Sense of Paediatric Pain’ by Mara Buchbinder (University of California Press, 2015). Expressions of interest are welcome from across the medical humanities. Although pain is a universal human experience, many view the pain of others as private, resistant to language, and, therefore, essentially unknowable. Read the full article…

Affect: Pleasure, Pain and Emotions – an interdisciplinary workshop (University of Sheffield, 5-6 June 2015)

Affect: Pleasure, Pain and Emotions – an interdisciplinary workshop Friday 5 and Saturday 6 June 2015 University of Sheffield, UK This interdisciplinary workshop will bring together philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists to discuss the following topics amongst others: Pleasures, pains, and emotions are affective states. Why so? What makes a throbbing pain and a feeling of Read the full article…

The past, present and future of pain control (Seminar, Royal Society of Medicine, 29 May 2015)

The aim of the session is to explore how pain has been portrayed over the centuries, how it has been managed in laboratory animals and in the military settings over the years. At the end of the session participants will be able to: Appreciate how fundamental pain is to human life and how our approach Read the full article…