Affect Formations: Musical performance with live animations shaped by emotional online survey

The Affect Formations project with the Music Department of Durham University explores the relationship between our emotional response to drawings and musical features through several public performances in the North East. Artist Adinda van ’t Klooster is inviting people to complete an online survey and in doing so contribute to an innovative artwork merging music, Read the full article…

The Conference on Sonification of Health and Environmental Data (12 September 2014, University of York)

Can you imagine what ozone pollution sounds like? Could a singing bowl, made with your own blood pressure data, help focus your mind on a healthy lifestyle? Would birdsong convince you to reduce your energy consumption? The Conference on Sonification of Health and Environmental Data is funded by Wellcome Trust and Centre for Chronic Diseases Read the full article…

“Le Traumatisme”: Performance at Vane Gallery (26 July 2014, Newcastle)

You are invited to ‘Le Traumatisme’ performance at Vane Gallery, Newcastle, on Saturday 26 July 8-10pm. Doors open at 7:30pm. This Push Push Practice performance event combines newly developed contemporary dance theatre, contemporary music, and cinematography, all inspired by the theme of trauma. For more information, click here.    

Music, Emotions and Well-being: historical and scientific perspectives (Conference, London, 20 June 2014)

Music, Emotions and Well-being: historical and scientific perspectives International Conference, 20 June 2014, Robin Brook Centre, Queen Mary University of London Organised by Penelope Gouk (Manchester), James Kennaway (Newcastle), Jacomien Prins (Warwick), and Wiebke Thormählen (Royal College of Music) Music is commonly treated as an emotional stimulant that can calm, console or energise. That music Read the full article…

The Experience Economy and the Mechanics of Wonder

The following post by Jules Evans is reproduced with permission from Philosophy for Life. I attended a seminar on wonder at the Centre for Medical Humanities in Durham last week. This post comes from our discussions there. Thanks to all the participants and to Martyn Evans for a great day. Although religion is no longer Read the full article…

“Lab Notes”: Illuminating biology & robotics through contemporary classical music (Launch, Edinburgh, 14 May 2013)

Join us at the The Royal Society of Edinburgh for: The launch of Lab Notes – Illuminating biology and robotics through contemporary classical music Organised by: ESRC Genomics Policy & Research Forum in association with The Royal Society Of Edinburgh Tuesday 14 May 2013, 6pm The Royal Society Of Edinburgh 22-26 George Street, Edinburgh, EH2 2PQ When we think of robots we Read the full article…

Bad Vibrations: Music as a Cause of Hysteria, Sex, Madness and Death? James Kennaway (Seminar & Masterclass, Edinburgh, 26 March 2013)

First Event in new Scottish Health Humanities Seminar and Masterclass Series Dr James Kennaway, “Bad Vibrations: Music as a Cause of Hysteria, Sex, Madness and Death?” 6.00-7.30pm (doors open at 5.30pm), Tuesday 26 March 2013. Room 1.9 in Doorway 6, Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh Abstract: For most people, music is an entirely positive part Read the full article…

Hearing Landscape Critically: Music, Place, & the Spaces of Sound (CFP, Conference, Stellenbosch, South Africa, 9-11 Sept 2013)

Hearing Landscape Critically: Music, Place, and the Spaces of Sound University of Stellenbosch (South Africa), 9-11 September 2013 Call for Papers ‘We live in densely storiated landscapes […there are] song-lines, if you will, joining place to place.’ (Robert Macfarlane) Landscapes are divided and dissonant sites of private and collective being. They bear traces of present, Read the full article…

Bad Vibrations: The History of the Idea of Music as a Cause of Disease – A New Book by James Kennaway

Can music make you ill? Can it make listeners hysterical or brainwash them? James Kennaway’s new book examines the history of medical fears about the potential effect of music on health. Music has been used as a cure for disease since as far back as King David’s lyre, but the notion that it might be Read the full article…