Drawing Out Obstetric Fistula: art and medicine research

I am now in Tanzania based at CCBRT in Dar es Salaam. We are exploring the potential of   art and narrative, both verbal and visual, to raise awareness of the huge problem in Africa of obstetric fistula. My blogsite for more information is: http://drawingof.wordpress.com/artists-blog/ I hope that this work will be of interest and any Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (final post 2014): Dr Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

So, in a few days I will be taking my leave of Galveston once again. Of course I am sad to leave the island although I am looking forward to going home and excited about everything I have achieved during my ‘oh too short’ time here. I gave a colloquium and a drawing workshop and, Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (weeks 3-4): Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

Just one more week to go here in Galveston. I have been dividing my time between drawing the anatomy lab and studying in the Library here at the University of Texas Medical Branch. In the latter, while reading up on the historical context of everything that the Drawing Women’s Cancer project is, I came across Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (week 2) : Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

SEAWEED! The news here calls it a “relentless three-day onslaught of seaweed that piled up on beaches at a rate not seen in years, leaving mounds of Sargassum several feet high in places”. The Galveston Park Board executive director said  “This is probably the worst case of seaweed we’ve seen in at least the last Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston 2014: Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas Centre for Medical Humanities

Back in Galveston! Invited again by the wonderful folk at the University of Texas Centre for Medical Humanities to spend another month working here on the Drawing Women’s Cancer project (drawingcancer.wordpress.com), I am delighted to be back on the island and full of plans for how to use the month. It feels good to be Read the full article…

Notes from Glaveston (Final Post): Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

Week 9. This will be my final post in this series as my time in Galveston is coming to an end. My work in the anatomy department over the last couple of weeks reminded me however how much my visual practice – the sheer simplicity of drawing – helps me ‘think’ in a clear and Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (Week 8): Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

Week 8! Week 7 disappeared in a visit from a friend, complete with car, and an amazing (for an artist with a passion for the human form) voyage into the world of the University of Texas Medical Branch Anatomy Department! I stepped away temporarily from the Drawing Women’s Cancer box in order to see parts Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (week 6), Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

Scratch everything I said last week about 70,000 biking incomers to the island this week… word is that there were over 400,000 extra people here over this last weekend! It would not surprise me at all if this were indeed the case as there seemed to be a sea of bikes from the seawall to Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (week 5), Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

Galveston is gearing up for this year’s Lone Star Rally which is a four day ‘bikers’ festival beginning on Thursday this week. Over 70,000 people are expected to roll into this small island and party all weekend. I love on a main thoroughfare right in the heart of the action so I expecting the peace Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (Week 3): Jac Saorsa, Visiting scholar at the University of Texas

The air is cooler now in Galveston, there are clouds in the sky and the seabirds are not so bothered by swimmers and surfers in their territory. We even had rain the other day, hard, even torrential, somebody said we caught the tail end of a tropical storm. Plenty of  people  do still flock to the beaches however, Read the full article…