‘We’re All Mad Here’ (Film Screening and Q&A with the filmmaker, 17 December 2014, Durham University)

‘We’re All Mad Here’   by Conor McCormackWednesday 17 December 5.30 – 7 pm The Joachim Room, College of St Hild and St Bede Durham University, Leazes Road, Durham DH1 1SZ For the past 3 years independent filmmaker Conor McCormack has been documenting the Bristol Hearing Voices Network, a self-help group for people who hear voices or experience intrusive thoughts. Read the full article…

Screen Bodies: A new journal of screen and body studies

Screen Bodies is a new peer-reviewed journal focusing on the intersection of Screen Studies and Body Studies across disciplines, institutions, and media. It is a forum promoting the discussion of research and practices through articles, reviews, and interviews that investigate various aspects of embodiment on and in front of screens. The journal considers moving and Read the full article…

Blood Makes Noise – Evaluation available of unique film exploring chronic kidney failure.

The final evaluation and report for the film Blood Makes Noise is now online here where you can also watch the full film for free online if you haven’t seen it yet. Blood Makes Noise is a film-based art and science project about renal failure, dialysis, diet and transplant. The project sheds light on the Read the full article…

Before and Since (the Wound) – Visualising the Experience of Pain

In painting the image of a child dying of hunger, my aim is not to make a re-presentation of a child dying of hunger, or to elicit or express what it feels like to watch a child dying of hunger. My aim is to paint hunger itself. The above comment is one that I made Read the full article…

Hitching Arts in Health on the Road to Nowhere

Mike White writes: The country road in Australia is mostly A to B straight on and can seem to traverse interplanetary distance.  Crossing the aboriginal lands of ‘first nation’ people, however, it is a road to nowhere as highlighted in John Pilger’s provocative TV documentary Utopia that aired on ITV this week. I had thought Read the full article…

Cyborg-Ethics Film Festival (Edinburgh, 22 – 24 Nov 2013)

Cyborg-Ethics Film Festival | Filmhouse, Edinburgh | 22 – 24 Nov 2013 How far can human beings go, when replacing their body parts with that of machines, before they become cyborgs? Will humanity eventually become obsolete? Should individuals download themselves into their computers before they die? What would these new developments mean for their identity? Read the full article…

The Subject of Addiction: Culture & Clinic (CFP, Conference, Nottingham, 11–12 September 2014)

Call For Papers International Conference: The Subject of Addiction – Culture and Clinic The University of Nottingham, September 11-12 2014  It is almost a commonplace to note the connections between drug-use and creative practices, from Thomas de Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, through Beat generation writers like William Burroughs, and on to filmic and Read the full article…

In and ‘Out of Focus': IUAES Conference with Perspectives From 69 Nations (Conference Review)

Entering the foyer of the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester last week was an immersion into a world of multiple realities, cheek to cheek: expressed in the contrasting colours and cuts of  clothing, and the colliding cross rhythms of numerous languages.  This was the enormous and inspirational International Union of Anthropological and Ethnographic Sciences (IUAES) conference, which Read the full article…

Designer Vaginas and the ethics of labia surgery (British Science Festival Event, 10 September, Newcastle)

Tuesday 10th September, 6pm-8pm Tyneside Cinema, 10 Pilgrim Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 6QG Map As part of the British Science Festival, this event explores the ethics of plastic surgery in the UK, with particular focus on the increasing trend for women to undergo labia surgery (labiaplasty) to neaten the appearance of their genitals. Centrefold Read the full article…

Review – Desert Runners (2013)

Some materialists are fond of pointing out that we are things among countless other human and non-human things. Composed of all that cellular stuff, we are never quite ourselves, never exactly contemporary with every aspect of what we might call our ‘self’. Some think this cheerless while others might find an insistence on our materiality Read the full article…