The Cultural History of Exhaustion – Review

This review of the Exhaustion conference appeared on the fantastic Sleep Cultures blog: “On 25 October 2013, the University of Kent hosted a one-day interdisciplinary conference on exhaustion, organized by Anna Katharina Schaffner (Comparative Literature, Kent) and funded by the Wellcome Trust, that brought together scholars from the arts, medicine, sociology, psychology, literary studies and Read the full article…

Exhaustion (One day workshop, University of Kent, Friday 25 October 2013)

Exhaustion Friday, 25 October, Cathedral Lodge, Canterbury Funded by the Wellcome Trust Organised by Anna Katharina Schaffner This interdisciplinary conference explores different medical, psychological and socio-political narratives on the origins of and cures for exhaustion. Experts from diverse disciplines (including psychiatrists, psychologists, social scientists, occupational health specialists, literary scholars and filmmakers) will talk about different Read the full article…

Madness Contested: Power and Practice (Review by Jonathan Gadsby)

Jonathan Gadsby, PhD candidate at Birmingham City University, reviews Steven Coles, Sarah Keenan and Bob Diamond, eds., Madness Contested: Power and Practice (Ross-on-Wye: PCCS Books, 2013): It was impossible for me to read this new collection dispassionately and I will not be the only one. I found myself in turns punching the air and nervously Read the full article…

Towards a Cultural History of Exhaustion: Anna Katharina Schaffner (Public Lecture, Durham, 25 April 2013)

The School of Modern Languages and Cultures Literature, History, Theory Research Group presents Towards a Cultural History of Exhaustion Dr Anna Katharina Schaffner (Comparative Literature, University of Kent) Thursday 25 April, 5.00-7.00 pm A56 Elvet Riverside, Durham University This paper explores how ‘exhaustion’ – understood both as a subjective physico-psychological experience and a broader phenomenon Read the full article…

New Podcast – Yoga and Mental Health

Image: Sarah Brumgart In recent years I have become surrounded by yoga fanatics. Many things impress me about their relationship with yoga but, above all, it’s their dedication to telling me (and anybody else that will appear interested) just how great yoga is for them. Their proselytising eventually put me in a  yoga class. What a Read the full article…

The Practical Art of Medicine: dissection, diagnosis and disease in the Early Modern Period (Exhibition and Events, Durham University, 2013)

The Practical Art of Medicine: dissection, diagnosis and disease in the Early Modern Period is a ‘Spotlight’ exhibition in the Wolfson Gallery, Palace Green Library, Durham. It looks at the period between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries and its many advances in the study of anatomy, chemistry and physiology. Inspired by the collections of physician, Read the full article…

The Anatomy of Melancholy: A User’s Guide (Conference, Warwick, 26 November 2012)

  10:00 – 16:00 Monday 26 November 2012 The National Grid Room, Warwick Arts Centre University of Warwick, CV1 7AL The Anatomy of Melancholy is nearly 400 years old and 1500 pages long. It is an attempt to identify all forms of Melancholy, their causes, symptoms and cures. It is bizarre, profound, consoling, riotous and one Read the full article…

Review ‘From Melancholia to Prozac: A History of Depression’

Clark Lawlor, From Melancholia to Prozac: A History of Depression (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012). Review by Angela Woods for the British Society for Literature and Science: What’s in a word? In his celebrated Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness, William Styron protests most vehemently against the vocabulary of twentieth-century psychiatry. For the last eighty Read the full article…

Melancholy Minds and Painful Bodies: Genealogy, Geography, Pathogeny (CFP, Conference, University of Liverpool, 9-11 July 2013)

Melancholy Minds and Painful Bodies: Genealogy, Geography, Pathogeny University of Liverpool, 9-11 July 2013 Call for Papers *extended to April 30 * Strange Contraries in thee combine, Both hell and Heaven in thee meet, Thou greatest bitter, greatest sweet No pain is like thy pain, no pleasure too like thine. – John Norris, 1687 One Read the full article…

Emotional Experience in Depression: A Philosophical Study – Project Web Site Launch

Emotional Experience in Depression: A Philosophical Study is a three-year project led by Professor Matthew Ratcliffe (Durham University) and Professor Achim Stephan (University of Osnabruck). Its aim is to provide the first ever detailed, systematic philosophical study of the nature and role of altered mood, emotion and feeling in depression. Researchers have explored topics such Read the full article…