2018 International Health Humanities Consortium Conference, Stanford: A snapshot and two questions (Review by Emily Troscianko, University of Oxford)

In late April, the 2018 International Health Humanities Consortium Conference happened in the palm-treed glamour of the Stanford Medical School. It was my first major medical/health humanities conference, and I was really encouraged to see how much is happening in this field in the US. There were panel sessions introducing a range of undergrad and Read the full article…

“25 Years of Madness and Modernism” A review by James Whitehead

I first encountered Louis Sass’s Madness and Modernism about a dozen years ago, when I was studying for an MA in modern literature. I had always been interested in writing about madness and the psyche as an undergraduate, and was looking around for a suitable topic for a dissertation, and perhaps a PhD too. My Read the full article…

Collaboration, Cooperation and Conversations: The Inaugural Congress of the NNMHR (blog post by Natalie Mullen, Lancaster University)

Natalie Mullen is a PhD candidate based at Lancaster University. Her research is funded by the AHRC and examines patient agency in the nineteenth-century asylum. The Inaugural Congress of the NNMHR (#NNMHR17) fell in the final weeks of the second year of my PhD. I had just finished working on a chapter focussed on how Read the full article…

Marketplace and Open Space: ‘A Box of Tricks’ at the Inaugural Congress of the NNMHR (Blog post by Ute Oswald, University of Warwick)

Ute Oswald is doing a PhD in the History of Medicine at the University of Warwick, having already completed an MA at Hamburg University in Classical Archaeology and Italian and an MSt at Oxford University in Literature and Arts. I was fortunate enough to attend the Inaugural Congress of the Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research Read the full article…

Interconnections and Interactions at the NNMHR Inaugural Congress (Blog post by Caitlin Stobie, University of Leeds)

Caitlin Stobie is a PhD candidate at the University of Leeds working on representations of abortion, embodiment, and agency in southern African fiction. She is a research intern on the AHRC-funded research network “The Risks of Childbirth in Historical Perspective” and co-director of the Leeds Animal Studies Network. On Thursday 14 September, 2017, I travelled Read the full article…

Narrative Medicine and Natural Semantic Metalanguage: An Emerging Dialogue

“I have been wondering about the benefits that the use of more intelligible and realistic language, instead of jargon, could have for patients and doctors alike. In that respect, meeting Anna Wierzbicka, a Professor of Linguistics, and the founder of the Natural Semantic Metalanguage approach (together with Cliff Goddard), was an eye opener for me.” Maria Giulia Marini Read the full article…

Our Battle for Breath: making lung health a priority (Reblog, Ian Jarrold, British Lung Foundation)

This is the fourth and final blog in a series of responses by Life of Breath to the British Lung Foundation’s Battle for Breath report. Join us today at 12:00GMT on Twitter to discuss the issues #breathreport. Ian Jarrold, the British Lung Foundation’s Head of Research, considers the future of respiratory health in the UK. When the British Lung Foundation Read the full article…

‘Lies, damned lies, and statistics’: mesothelioma in literature (Reblog, Dr Arthur Rose, Life of Breath)

This is the third of a series of responses by Life of Breath to the British Lung Foundation’s Battle for Breath report. Join us on Twitter to discuss the issues, Thursday 24 November 2016, 12:00GMT #breathreport. Arthur Rose discusses why, as a literary scholar, he found some of the report’s statistics surprising: When the science writer, Stephen Jay Gould, Read the full article…

How does culture shape the language of breathlessness? (Reblog, Dr Rebecca Oxley, Life of Breath)

This is the second of a series of responses by Life of Breath to the British Lung Foundation’s Battle for Breath report. Join us on Twitter to discuss the issues, Thursday 24 November 2016, 12:00GMT #breathreport. Researcher Rebecca Oxley considers what insights anthropology can offer: The British Lung Foundation (BLF) recently published a three year study into the prevalence and impact Read the full article…

Why is breathlessness invisible? (Reblog, Prof Jane Macnaughton, Life of Breath)

This is the first of a series of responses by Life of Breath to the British Lung Foundation’s Battle for Breath report. Join Life of Breath on Twitter to discuss the issues, Thursday 24 November 2016, 12:00GMT #breathreport. Principal Life of Breath investigator Prof Jane Macnaughton writes: Lung disease kills one person every five minutes. Unbelievably, this statistic has not Read the full article…