The Deconstructive Owl of Minerva – reviewed by Rampaul Chamba

‘The Deconstructive Owl of Minerva: An Examination of Schizophrenia through Philosophy, Psychoanalysis and Postmodernism’ by Lillian Burke (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013) Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and sponsor of arts, trade, and strategy. From the 2nd century BCE onwards, the Romans equated her with the Greek goddess Athena, the virgin goddess of music, poetry, and medicine. She Read the full article…

An Amazing Murmur of the Heart: Feeling the Patient’s Beat – reviewed by Mike White

‘An Amazing Murmur of the Heart: Feeling the Patient’s Beat’ by Cecil Helman (Hammersmith Books, 2014).  Mike White writes: Not long before he died in 2009, I was privileged to hear the anthropologist GP Cecil Helman speak in Durham on ‘Anthropological Perspectives on The Body’.  I was intrigued by his assertion that the body is the Read the full article…

An Amazing Murmur of the Heart: Feeling the Patient’s Beat – reviewed by Dr Anna Harris

‘An Amazing Murmur of the Heart: Feeling the Patient’s Beat’ by Cecil Helman (Hammersmith Books, 2014) A murmuration of clinical tales A doctor must be observant to notice their patients’ murmurs. They have to listen carefully, notice small details, be attentive to differences and change, and most important of all, take time to contemplate the Read the full article…

Cecil Helman – A Biography by Clive Sinclair

‘Cecil Helman – A Biography’ by Clive Sinclair Clive Sinclair offers a detailed and personal insight into the life and work of Cecil Helman to accompany clinical and academic reviews of his posthumous book,  ‘An Amazing Murmur of the Heart‘.   Cecil Helman (1944-2009) was not your average GP. I never visited his surgery, but Read the full article…

Four Meditations on Happiness – reviewed by Rob Boddice

‘Four Meditations on Happiness’ by Michael Hampe (Atlantic Books, 2014) What if, at the conclusion of Plato’s Republic, Plato had appended a short essay of explanation? Would it have robbed the dialogue of its allure, or added to its mystery? Michael Hampe’s book engages in a philosophical tradition of speaking through fictional voices, and I say with some trepidation Read the full article…

Painting Portraits: A Review

William Viney writes: There’s an old West Country joke of which I’ve grown fond: a Booker Prize winning novelist and a professor of clinical neurophysiology walk into a museum. There, they speak about faces, trauma, compassion, art, writing, experiment, and the First World War and, at the end, they agree they’re onto a good thing.As Read the full article…

Reviewer needed: ‘Maturing Masculinities: Aging, Chronic Illness, and Viagra in Mexico’ by Emily A. Wentzell

    Emily A. Wentzell‘s pioneering new book ‘Maturing Masculinities: Aging, Chronic Illness, and Viagra in Mexico’ (Duke University Press, 2013) is available for review. Expressions of interest are welcome from all angles of the medical humanities, but may be particularly appealing to anthropologists, clinicians or researchers with an interest in male health.  ‘Maturing Masculinities is a Read the full article…

Reviewer needed: ‘In Pursuit of the Good Life: Aspiration and Suicide in Globalizing South India’ by Jocelyn Lim Chua

With a view to broadening the boundaries of the medical humanities, we are offering ‘In Pursuit of the Good by: Aspiration and Suicide in Globalizing South India’ by Jocelyn Lim Chua (University of California Press, 2014) for review. Expressions of interest are welcome from across the medical humanities, but this book may be particularly well suited to Read the full article…

Going Dutch on Participation and Engagement in the Arts

Mike White writes: Utrecht, a city so flat it could be ‘sta-prest’, proved the appropriate setting for a bi-national conference attempting to iron out the wrinkles and nuances of meaning in research methodologies for participation and engagement in the arts. This event on 20-21 June was instigated by Leeds Met University as the culmination of Read the full article…

Reviewer needed: ‘Mother’ by Elinor Carucci

Elinor Carucci’s intriguing and insightful book ‘Mother’ (Prestel, 2013) is available for review. It raises interesting questions regarding the boundaries and definitions of the  medical humanities, as the collection of photographs explore both physical and emotional development in motherhood and childhood. Expressions of interest are welcome from across the medical humanities.  ‘Acclaimed photographer Elinor Carucci takes on her Read the full article…