Review of “International Network Toward Alternatives & Recovery” conference (Liverpool, June 2014)

Roz Oates, a doctoral student in Durham’s Centre for Medical Humanities and Department of Geography, who is also part of the Hearing the Voice research team, writes: International Network Toward Alternatives and Recovery International Conference: Liverpool, UK 25 – 27 June 2014 Between 25 and 27 June, I attended a conference on ‘Power to Communities: Read the full article…

New research from advanced breast cancer campaign ‘Here & Now’ reveals significant support gaps for patients

Research uncovers stark realities of life with advanced breast cancer (ABC) and the lack of support experienced by women living with the disease1 71% of patients say more could be done to improve access to new treatments1 Leading UK experts call for greater action to improve the level of care and support available to patients Read the full article…

Going Dutch on Participation and Engagement in the Arts

Mike White writes: Utrecht, a city so flat it could be ‘sta-prest’, proved the appropriate setting for a bi-national conference attempting to iron out the wrinkles and nuances of meaning in research methodologies for participation and engagement in the arts. This event on 20-21 June was instigated by Leeds Met University as the culmination of Read the full article…

Waste: A Philosophy of Things

The Centre for Medical Humanities is delighted to announce the publication of Leverhulme Research Fellow Dr Will Winey’s Waste: A Philosophy of Things (Bloomsbury 2014). Readers of the CMH blog are invited to read the Introduction here and to use the discount code – GLR D3D – to get 35% off the retail price. *** Why are Read the full article…

Angel Of The North promotes well-being – and cheaper bread

Mike White writes: I recently attended a presentation in Gateshead by Maeve Blackman, a Durham Ph. D student, on her completed thesis inquiring into whether Antony Gormley’s landmark sculpture the Angel of the North impacts on the well-being of local people. To fend off the inevitable controversy over public art, I detect an increasing requirement Read the full article…

Anxieties of communication: the limits of narrative in the medical humanities

What is and should be the role of narrative in the medical humanities? Responding to Angela Woods’ 2011 paper The limits of narrative, Dr Claire McKechnie (Glasgow Centre for Population Health) advances the discussion in her recent article for the BMJ Medical Humanities journal “Anxieties of communication: the limits of narrative in the medical humanities.” Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (final post 2014): Dr Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

So, in a few days I will be taking my leave of Galveston once again. Of course I am sad to leave the island although I am looking forward to going home and excited about everything I have achieved during my ‘oh too short’ time here. I gave a colloquium and a drawing workshop and, Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (weeks 3-4): Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

Just one more week to go here in Galveston. I have been dividing my time between drawing the anatomy lab and studying in the Library here at the University of Texas Medical Branch. In the latter, while reading up on the historical context of everything that the Drawing Women’s Cancer project is, I came across Read the full article…

‘Sleep / Agency / Activity’ Roundtable Discussion, Durham University, 8th May 2014 – Review

Patrick Levy, Philosophy PhD Candidate at Sussex University, writes: There is a certain degree of irony in a student of the philosophy of sleep sacrificing a substantial slice of sleep in order to attend a workshop on, amongst other things, sleep. With varying degrees of sleep deprivation (confessions of such abounded throughout the day) those Read the full article…

Notes from Galveston (week 2) : Jac Saorsa, Visiting Scholar at the University of Texas

SEAWEED! The news here calls it a “relentless three-day onslaught of seaweed that piled up on beaches at a rate not seen in years, leaving mounds of Sargassum several feet high in places”. The Galveston Park Board executive director said  “This is probably the worst case of seaweed we’ve seen in at least the last Read the full article…