Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research Congress (Van Mildert College Durham, 14-15 September 2017)

Save the Date! Durham University’s Centre for Medical Humanities will be hosting the first research congress of the Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research from 14 – 15 September 2017. The Northern Network was established in 2013 to provide support and demonstrate critical mass amongst universities interested in research in medical humanities outside London and the Read the full article…

Medicine and the Senses (CfP, Symposium, Leeds, 01 June 2017)

The Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities is organising a one-day interdisciplinary symposium to inspire debate on the role and significance of the senses within medicine. Abstracts are welcome from a wide range of disciplines. The value of the senses as an aid to diagnosis is demonstrated throughout the history of medicine. However, advances in digital Read the full article…

Association for Medical Humanities Annual Conference (CfP, Keele University, 28-30 June 2017)

The overarching theme for this year’s AMH conference is that of Critical Stories in the context of both Humanities and Arts research and production. This three-day conference will include plenary addresses by Dr Ima Jackson from Glasgow Caledonian University, Dr Mike Shooter, President of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy CBE, and Professor Mark Jackson, Exeter Read the full article…

Reading Bodies, Writing Minds (CfP, University of Nottingham, 13 April 2017)

‘Reading Bodies, Writing Minds’ is a one-day conference exploring mental health issues in the medical humanities, and will be held 13 April 2017 at Highfield House, The University of Nottingham’s University Park Campus. The conference is intended to stimulate interdisciplinary discussion on modern and historical aspects of medical humanities. The keynote speakers include Dr Mary Read the full article…

Hearing Voices: Suffering, Inspiration, and the Everyday (Exhibition, Durham, 5 November 2016 – 26 February 2017)

Hearing the Voice is delighted to announce that Hearing Voices: suffering, inspiration and the everyday – the first exhibition to examine voice-hearing from different cultural, clinical, historical, literary and spiritual perspectives – opens at Palace Green Library in Durham on Saturday 5 November 2016. Informed by Hearing the Voice research and containing material spanning seven centuries, Read the full article…

BodyCapital Inaugural Conference 2017 (CfA, Strasbourg, 23-25 February 2017)

The ERC BodyCapital research group is pleased to launch a call for applications for Student and Junior Scholar travel grants to the upcoming conference: “The healthy self as body capital. Individuals, market-based societies and body politics in visual twentieth century Europe”. The health perceptions and practices of individuals changed tremendously during a twentieth century in Europe characterized Read the full article…

Hubbub’s Rest Test survey results announced

Over two thirds (68 per cent) of the public would like more rest, according to the world’s largest ever survey on the topic. The results of the survey, led by Durham University researchers at Hubbub, also revealed that nearly a third (32 per cent) of respondents said they need more rest than the average person, Read the full article…

Springboard – Health of the Public 2040 (Grant scheme, Academy of Medical Sciences)

We are delighted to announce a new call for applications under our Springboard scheme, for researchers working in the health social sciences and medical humanities. Springboard – Health of the Public 2040 offers a bespoke package of support to researchers. Awards are available to researchers at the start of their first independent post to help launch Read the full article…

On Breath (Conference, Utrecht University, 6-9 July 2017)

“Under these conditions, the individual’s breathing is an observed, an occupied breathing. It is a combat breathing.” (Frantz Fanon) “Das Gedicht bleibt […] pneumatisch berührbar.” (Paul Celan) “The HEART, by way of the BREATH, to the LINE.” (Charles Olson) “Pas de parole sans air qui la véhicule.” (Luce Irigaray) “Je suis un respirateur.” (Marcel Duchamp) Read the full article…

Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research (Workshop, York Medical Society, 22 September 2016)

The Northern Network for Medical Humanities is very pleased to announce that registration is now open for the final workshop in the current series organised by the Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research, at York Medical Society on 22 September 2016. Supported by the Wellcome Trust, the workshops are a showcase of work in progress Read the full article…

“Talking Twins” – short film (CfP, London, 29th July 2016)

Call for participants, deadline: Friday 29th July 2016 We need you: Are you twins with a story to tell? We are looking for twins of all ages, genders, religions, ethnicities, identical, fraternal, conjoined or separated, to make a short film about what it means to be a twin in the 21st century. We know that twin people are Read the full article…

The Edinburgh Companion to the Critical Medical Humanities (Book Launch, Newcastle University, 28 July 2016)

The launch event for The Edinburgh Companion to the Critical Medical Humanities will take place on Thursday 28 July, 4-6pm, Percy Building, Newcastle University. The Companion will be launched by Deborah Bowman, Professor of Clinical and Mental Health Ethics at the Tavistock and Portman and Editor, BMJ Medical Humanities. The Companion is edited by Anne Whitehead and Read the full article…

Can the humanities influence the clinical science of breathlessness? (Conference panel, Edinburgh, 13 September 2016)

Jane Macnaughton, Co-Director of Durham University Centre for Medical Humanities, will be giving a talk at the Edinburgh International Conference of Medicine. She will be presenting current work in medical humanities that explores the symptom of breathlessness. Her talk will explain how interdisciplinary interactions between the arts, humanities, social science, clinical medicine and clinical science might Read the full article…

Rest & its discontents (Exhibition, The Mile End Art Pavilion, London, 30 Sept – 30 Oct 2016)

Rest & its discontents is a major new exhibition exploring rest and noise, tumult and work, through site-specific installations, artists’ moving image, performance, drawing, poetry, data, sound and music. The show draws on Hubbub, a two-year residency undertaken by fifty international artists, writers, social scientists, broadcasters, humanities researchers, scientists and mental health experts in The Read the full article…

Transformations: Sharing knowledge about territories and practices in the Medical Humanities (Conference, Northumbria University, 28th June 2016)

From its roots as an interdisciplinary field of medicine concerned primarily with the role of arts and humanities in the education of medical staff, through to newer and emerging practices that connect a wider range of disciplinary expertise to a broader circle of care in health and well-being, the medical/health humanities continuously challenge and disrupt Read the full article…

Congratulations Professor Felicity Callard!

The Centre for Medical Humanities is delighted to announce Felicity Callard’s promotion to Chair of Social Science for Medical Humanities at Durham University. Felicity is an interdisciplinary researcher who also engages with policy and advocacy in relation to mental health. Working at the intersection of the humanities, the social sciences and the life sciences, she Read the full article…

The Pharmacology of Addiction (Research Seminar, Durham University, 9th June 2016)

This Weekly Research Seminar will commence at 11:30am in room 005, 48/49 Old Elvet, Durham. Refreshments will be available from 11:00am with the talk commencing at 11:30am. Dr Gerald Moore – The Pharmacology of Addiction Abstract: A photo from a December 2014 issue of The New Scientist shows an adolescent undergoing treatment at an Internet Read the full article…

‘The Practice, Benefits and Challenges of Interdisciplinarity: for postgraduate researchers’ (CfA, Durham University, June 22-23 2016)

New extended deadline – June 8th, 2016 You are invited to take part in a two day workshop on the experience of interdisciplinary team working. The workshop will take place from lunchtime on Wednesday 22nd June to lunchtime on Thursday 23rd June at Durham University. It will be hosted by staff from Durham University’s Centre Read the full article…

Exposure: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Breath, Air and Atmospheres (Conference Panel, Durham University, 5 July 2016)

Durham team members Rebecca Oxley and Andrew Russell will be convening a panel exploring the cultural, historical and phenomenological significance of breath, air, and atmospheres at the Association for Social Anthropology’s 2016 conference on Tuesday July 5th from 9am – 4pm. Presentations include: Making breath visible – Jane Macnaughton (Durham University) Breath and rhythm in the experience of Read the full article…

Afterwar: Healing the Moral Wounds of War (Public Lecture, Durham Cathedral, Prior’s Hall, June 7th 2016)

Discussions of post-traumatic stress often underplay the moral dimensions of  psychological injuries and the attitudes that go with it–guilt, shame, moral disappointment, feeling responsible for doing wrong or being wronged or being complicit. Georgetown philosophy professor Nancy Sherman turns her focus to moral injuries and the nature of moral recovery. She argues that psychology and Read the full article…

PhD studentship: ‘Changing Cultures in Health and Medicine’ (Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Liverpool)

The University of Liverpool is seeking applications for a fully funded PhD studentship in the Medical Humanities and Social Sciences to be associated with the Centre for Health, Arts and Science (CHARTS). Alongside PhD research, the successful candidate will play a role in raising the profile of research in this area, including developing the web Read the full article…

‘The Practice, Benefits and Challenges of Interdisciplinarity: for postgraduate researchers’ (CfA, Durham University, June 22-23 2016)

New extended deadline – June 8th, 2016 You are invited to take part in a two day workshop on the experience of interdisciplinary team working.  The workshop will take place from lunchtime on Wednesday 22nd June to lunchtime on Thursday 23rd June at Durham University.  It will be hosted by staff from Durham University’s Centre Read the full article…

Matters of the Mind: The Materialities of Mental Ill-Health and Distress (CfP, Edited Volume, 22 May 2016)

Volume edited by Anna Lavis (University of Birmingham) and Karin Eli (University of Oxford) From medications to diagnostic manuals, somatic sensations to brain images, the landscape of mental health and illness is replete with diverse materialities. Against the background of a wider ‘material turn’ across the social sciences and humanities, this edited collection will engage Read the full article…

Chemical Youth Lecture Review

What do chemical and pharmaceutical substances, both legal and illicit, ‘do’ for youth? This is the question posed by the Chemical Youth project, funded by the European Research Council, which aims to understand the chemical lives of young people in France, the Netherlands, Indonesia and the Philippines. In this public lecture, project leader Professor Anita Hardon from Read the full article…

Adverse events: On bad affects and the antidepressant wars (Public lecture, Henry Wellcome Auditorium, 7 June 2016)

The Feminist Theory Annual Lecture, organised this year in collaboration with Hubbub, aims to promote feminist theory and to bring together cutting edge thinkers in order to encourage lively, high level debate on topical issues within the academy and beyond. Previous speakers have included Raewyn Connell (University of Sydney), Kathy Davis (VU University Amsterdam) and Robyn Wiegman Read the full article…

Special issue call for papers: Self-knowledge in and out of illness

Palgrave Communications, published by Palgrave Macmillan, is inviting article proposals for a special issue on self-knowledge in and out of illness. Collection Editors Professor Sherrilyn Roush and Dr Tuomas Pernu (Department of Philosophy, King’s College London, UK) Scope Self-knowledge has always played a role in healthcare since people need to be able to accurately assess Read the full article…

Medical Humanities – Intersection of Medicine and Literature (Call for papers, MedHum Fiction)

MedHum Fiction|Daily Dose writes: Are you interested in writing about the medical humanities? Maybe you’re a horror movie fan with an interest in exploring the intersection between medical humanities and pop culture? Perhaps you’re interested in thinking about the process of writing or teaching history of medicine? If you are, then we want to hear Read the full article…

The Recovery of Beauty – announcing a new CMH publication with free excerpt

The Centre for Medical Humanities is delighted to announce the publication of The Recovery of Beauty: Arts, Medicine, Culture, edited by Corinne Saunders, Jane Macnaughton, and David Fuller. It is a collection that developed from a public lecture series called The Recovery of Beauty, which was hosted by the Centre in collaboration with Durham University’s Read the full article…

Glasgow University Medical Humanities Network Website

Megan Coyer and Hannah Tweed announce the launch of the new  Glasgow University Medical Humanities Network website: Friday 22nd January saw the launch of the new Glasgow University Medical Humanities Network Website. With the site now live and fully functioning, we would like to cordially invite you to use it as a resource to engage with the Read the full article…

Psychosomatic illness in popular culture (CfP, Edited Collection, 26 February 2016)

Medically unexplained symptoms, hysteria, neurasthenia, hypochondria, psychogenic illness, somatic symptoms, functional illness, malingering—there is ongoing debate amongst specialists in medicine, psychology, sociology, and the medical humanities about how to classify, diagnose, treat, and explain disorders affecting body and mind. Meanwhile, in popular culture, these terms are misunderstood, unknown, or rejected outright—what was once called “psychosomatic” illness is Read the full article…

‘The philosophical role of illness’ (Inaugural Lecture, University of Bristol, 11th April 2016)

The philosophical role of illness – Harvi Carel Philosophical methods have been used to study illness for several decades. In this talk I reverse the relationship between the two, asking: does illness have a philosophical role? I suggest that illness modifies, and thus sheds light on, normal experience, revealing its ordinary and therefore overlooked structure. Read the full article…

‘Breathing in context: historical and cross-cultural perspectives on breath’ (Symposium, Durham University, 8-9 March 2016)

Tue 8 March @ 11:00 am – Wed 9 March @ 4:00 pm Joachim Room, College of St Hild & St Bede, Durham Breath, a physiological universal, is uniquely both an automatic and controllable process at different times; it is also a subjective experience, an elaborated technique, and a fundamental part of knowledge systems and world Read the full article…

Fully-funded Life of Breath PhD (CfA, Durham University, 1 February 2016)

Would you like to join the Durham Life of Breath project team? As part of our commitment to engaged research, we are planning to establish a group which will bring stakeholders with an interest in breath, breathing and breathlessness together to share information, knowledge and experience in a congenial setting. We are now recruiting for Read the full article…

Announcing a collection of essays on voice-hearing in The Lancet

by Hearing the Voice | Dec 16, 2015 Hearing the Voice is delighted to draw our readers’ attention to a collection of five articles on voice-hearing that has been published recently in The Lancet’s ‘Art of Medicine’ section. Written by Hearing the Voice researchers, the articles in the series explore the ways in which insights Read the full article…

‘Hearing Voices’ – Durham University features the work of Hearing the Voice

The research project, Hearing the Voice (HtV), was recently awarded additional funding from the Wellcome Trust until 2020, following their initial three-year grant. Led by Professor Charles Fernyhough and Dr Angela Woods from Durham’s Centre for Medical Humanities, the team hopes to reduce stigma and discrimination for people with voice-hearing experiences. Durham University has recently posted an in-depth online article about the Read the full article…

Social Media and Health: Meeting the Ethical Challenges (Funding, Wellcome Trust, 15 January 2016)

The new Themed Seed Awards are now live, providing flexible funding that will enable researchers to develop an innovative research response to a strategic challenge defined by the Wellcome Trust. In this themed Seed Award round, we invite applications that directly address the ethical challenges surrounding social media and health. Areas of interest include, but Read the full article…

How Do You Rest? A national survey by Hubbub.

(4 November 2015) The British public are being invited to share their experiences of rest as part of a national ‘Rest Test’. The Rest Test is an online survey to investigate the nation’s resting habits and their attitudes towards relaxation and busyness. It is part of a wider collaboration between BBC Radio 4 and Wellcome Read the full article…

Making the invisible visible, a review of the Life of Breath launch event.

Sarah McLusky – Project Manager for the Life of Breath project reports on the Life of Breath Launch event: Guests gathered at Durham University’s Joachim Room on 23 September to celebrate the launch of Life of Breath, a Wellcome Trust funded project exploring breathing and breathlessness. Invisibility is a powerful metaphor for breathing, breathlessness and Read the full article…

“Rethinking Interdisciplinarity across the Social Sciences and Neurosciences”: Open Access Book by Felicity Callard and Des Fitzgerald published today

Rethinking Interdisciplinarity across the Social Sciences and Neurosciences, co-authored by Felicity Callard (member of Durham’s Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH) and Department of Geography) and Des Fitzgerald (Lecturer in Sociology, Cardiff University; the book was written while Des was an affiliate of the Centre for Medical Humanities) offers a provocative account of interdisciplinary research across Read the full article…

‘Hearing the Voice’ (HtV 2) another five years – congratulations!

The Wellcome Trust has awarded ‘Hearing the Voice’ another five-years of research as one of two projects to be the first of its Humanities and Social Science Collaborative Awards. ‘Hearing the Voice’ will continue with its innovative work in exploring the experience of voice hearing through unique insights from the humanities and social sciences. The Wellcome Trust had Read the full article…

Making the Invisible Visible – launch of the Life of Breath project (Durham University, 23 September 2015)

Making the Invisible Visible Join us to celebrate the Durham launch of the Life of Breath research project. Diverse project collaborators, ranging from an artist to an archaeologist, will discuss what breath means to them. These perspectives will be framed by encounters with breath made visible through music, sound and speech. Life of Breath is Read the full article…

Feminist Phenomenology, Medicine, Bioethics, and Health (CfPapers, International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics, 1 February, 2017)

Although by no means mainstream, phenomenological approaches to bioethics and philosophy of medicine are no longer novel. Such approaches take the lived body – as opposed the body understood as a material, biological object – as a point of departure. Such approaches are also invested in a detailed examination and articulation of a plurality of Read the full article…

Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities (CfP, Journal Issue – BMJ Medical Humanities, 1 March 2016)

As part of the Wellcome Trust funded project ‘Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities’, the BMJ Group journal Medical Humanities will be publishing a special issue guest-edited by Dr Gavin Miller, University of Glasgow. We invite papers of broad interest to an international readership of medical humanities scholars and practising clinicians on the topic ‘Science Read the full article…

Published Today: ‘Critical Medical Humanities’, a special issue of BMJ’s Medical Humanities

It is with great pleasure that we announce the publication of a special issue of Medical Humanities journal, edited by Centre for Medical Humanities researchers William Viney, Felicity Callard, and Angela Woods. Exploring the many valences of the word ‘critical’ across and beyond the medical humanities, the special collection champions a ‘critical medical humanities’ characterised Read the full article…

Announcing the death of Mike White, our friend, colleague and arts-in-health visionary

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of our friend, long-time colleague, and arts-in-health visionary Mike White. Mike has been an integral part of the Durham Centre for Medical Humanities since its earliest days as the Centre for Arts and Humanities in Health and Medicine, and was a research fellow of St Chad’s Read the full article…

The Life of Breath Project in the Lancet Respiratory

CMH is pleased to annouce the latest article published from the Life of Breath Project in the Lancet Respiratory: Invisible suff ering: breathlessness in and beyond the clinic written by Havi Carel, Jane Macnaughton and James Dodd. This article highlights, among other things, the importance for a research focus on breathlessness and how this research can impact Read the full article…

Pain in the medical humanities: A special edition collection

Pain in the medical humanities: A special edition collection. Edited by Ben Kasstan with Angela Woods; Centre for Medical Humanities, Durham University. Following our call for contributions, we are pleased to present a special edition collection on pain as a field of enquiry in the medical humanities. Our international and interdisciplinary contributors have generously shared Read the full article…

Announcing Working Knowledge: Practical Resources for Interdisciplinary Research

Interdisciplinary research: intermittently theorised, frequently funded, increasingly valorised. But how is it actually done? In order to explore answers to this question, and in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust and Durham’s Centre for Medical Humanities, Hearing the Voice has created Working Knowledge. Working Knowledge is a collection of Project Shorts: short, accessible introductions to the practical ins and outs of interdisciplinary research. Covering everything from Read the full article…

Introducing Chalkie’s Demon Diary: Mike White’s occasional rants & reflections during the progress of his illness

On 3/2/15 it gets written that ‘Chalkie’ is Mike White, erstwhile arts and health agent for the Centre for Medical Humanities at Durham University and abiding research fellow of St. Chad’s College. He has also been to some degree responsible for delivering the Angel of the North to Tyneside and for steering the development of Read the full article…

‘The Life of Breath’ and what it means to breath

The recently published ‘2014 Annual Review of the Wellcome Trust’ highlights the ‘The Life of Breath’, a recent Medical Humanities Joint Investigator Award. Joint Investigators Professor Jane McNaughton at Durham University and Professor Havi Carel at the University of Bristol were awarded funds made available by the Wellcome’s expanded remit within the health-related humanities and social science. As outlined on page Read the full article…

Durham University’s Interdisciplinary Doctoral Training Programme in Visual Culture

Readers of the CMH blog will be interested to note the launch of Durham University’s Interdisciplinary Training Programme in Visual Culture. This new Leverhulme-funded training scheme, headed by the Centre for Visual Art and Culture (CVAC), will run for five years, with intakes in 2015, 16 and 17. Applications may now be made for the first Read the full article…

Beatings with a Carrot – Mike White on Arts and Diversity

Mike White, CMH Arts in Health Correspondent, writes: It has been the Arts Council’s misfortune that in the past it has interpreted ‘diversity’ as culture’s prerogative to go off in all directions, leaving it to mediate successive governments’ melting pot metaphors of an inclusive multi-racial Britain. But recently in a sharp policy announcement that is Read the full article…

Think-Tanks and the Governance of Science: Guest Post by Martyn Pickersgill & Emilie Cloatre

Think-tanks play a key role in policy today. Yet, for scholars who are concerned with the dynamics within and between law and science, the place and impact of such organisations are often over-looked. To begin to remedy this, we held an event titled ‘Regulating Bioscience: Between the Ivory Tower and the Policy Room’ on the Read the full article…

Breathless in Cambridge: the Breathlessness Research Interest Group (BRIG) Conference 2014

Jane Macnaughton, Professor of Medical Humanities and Joint Senior Investigator on  Life Of Breath, writes: Getting going with the Life of Breath project has been a real revelation for me as someone who is committed to critically engaged medical humanities. It has always been a bit of a struggle to get clinicians interested in what Read the full article…

The Pathology of BODY WORLDS Vital

Fusing art and science engagement to explore the pathology of Von Hagens plastinates. By Rachael Allen Blog address BODY WORLDS Vital made its UK debut at Newcastle’s Centre For Life this year, displaying Dr Gunther Von Hagen’s plastinated human bodies exploring the physiology of human health and wellness. As a visual artist and researcher of Read the full article…

What is the New Generations Programme?

Emerging humanities researchers are increasingly engaging with interdisciplinary research but lack contexts in which to learn and experience how it is done. Durham University’s Centre for Medical Humanities, funded by the AHRC in collaboration with the Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research and Wellcome Trust introduces the New Generations Programme. This unique programme aims to Read the full article…

Medical Humanities in Africa – A Conference Review by Megan Wainwright

Megan Wainwright writes: ‘Medical Humanities in Africa…’ What are they? Who does them? What should they be? These were some of the overarching questions that framed a vibrant two-day conference at the idyllic Monkey Valley Resort in Noordhoek, South Africa (see photo!). Having only arrived in Cape Town five months ago it was a huge Read the full article…

Painting Portraits: A Review

William Viney writes: There’s an old West Country joke of which I’ve grown fond: a Booker Prize winning novelist and a professor of clinical neurophysiology walk into a museum. There, they speak about faces, trauma, compassion, art, writing, experiment, and the First World War and, at the end, they agree they’re onto a good thing.As Read the full article…

Neuroscience and Social Science: Experimental Imaginations

This podcast was developed through Pod Academy – an open access podcasting initiative based in London. It features CMH’s Felicity Callard, the KCL-based sociologist Des Fitzgerald, and William Viney. This podcast is about the relations between the social sciences and the neurosciences, and what it might mean to do interdisciplinary work between these areas. Des Read the full article…

‘Sleep / Agency / Activity’ Roundtable Discussion, Durham University, 8th May 2014 – Review

Patrick Levy, Philosophy PhD Candidate at Sussex University, writes: There is a certain degree of irony in a student of the philosophy of sleep sacrificing a substantial slice of sleep in order to attend a workshop on, amongst other things, sleep. With varying degrees of sleep deprivation (confessions of such abounded throughout the day) those Read the full article…

Fiction as Therapy: Towards a Neo-Phenomenological Theory of the Novel

Re-blogged from Research English at Durham:In the first lecture of a new British Academy series on The Novel in English, Professor Patricia Waugh reflects upon the recent rise of institutions such as the Reader Organisation, which encourages shared reading in therapeutic contexts such as hospitals and prisons. Taking this observation as a starting point, Waugh suggests that in recent years the Read the full article…

2014 UK Blog Awards: Centre for Medical Humanities Blog ‘highly commended’ in Health (Organisation) category

Felicity Callard writes:   We are delighted to have heard that our Centre for Medical Humanities blog has been ‘Highly Commended’ at the 2014 UK Blog Awards in the Health (Organisation) category.   This means that the CMH blog is one of the top three organisational health blogs in the UK (no mean feat, given that we are Read the full article…

Bodies in Formation: An Ethnography of Anatomy and Surgical Education – reviewed by Chris Howe

‘Bodies in Formation: An Ethnography of Anatomy and Surgical Education’ by Rachel Prentice (Duke University Press, 2012). So why has Rachel Prentice chosen to write about surgery – what is essentially described as a ‘body-contact sport’ (p.6)?  It is precisely the physical nature of surgery that lends itself so well to the analysis of embodied Read the full article…

First Hub Residency at Wellcome Collection to be led by CMH staff member Felicity Callard with CMH Affiliate Charles Fernyhough in Core Team

The Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH) is delighted to announce that first two-year £1m residency of The Hub at Wellcome Collection will be led by Dr Felicity Callard (Senior Lecturer in CMH and the Department of Geography), with Prof Charles Fernyhough (CMH Affiliate) as one of the core team (along with Claudia Hammond, Dr Daniel Read the full article…

Looking for Wonder – Caspar Henderson

At the beginning of Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark, the explorers cross an ocean guided by a chart that is entirely blank.Wonder is probably less elusive than the Snark, whether Boojum or no. Virtually all of us report experiences of it.  But what is it, and where is it? Martyn Evans, author of Read the full article…

The Life of Breath : a new project on breathlessness and COPD

Durham University Centre for Medical Humanities is delighted to announce that we will be hosting a new project jointly with the University of Bristol from October 2014.  The project is called ‘The Life of Breath’ and it is the result of a successful joint Senior Investigator Award application to the Wellcome Trust by Jane Macnaughton (Durham) Read the full article…

Jane Macnaughton – End Game Scenarios for Smoking in New Zealand

Jane Macnaughton writes: New Zealand’s South Island is a beautiful and unexpected place.  You can find yourself in a tiny village hall listening to a rather good folk duo and sitting right next to a Booker prize winning writer. Andrew Russell, co-convenor of the WRI Smoking Special Interest Group, and I are in New Zealand Read the full article…

Whistle While You Work (For Nothing): Positive Affect as Coercive Strategy – The Case of Workfare

In this post, Lynne Friedli and Robert Stearn look at the role of  psychological coercion, notably through the imposition of positive affect,  in UK Government workfare programmes. There has been little or no debate about the recruitment of psychology/psychologists into monitoring,  modifying and/or punishing  people who claim social security benefits. This silence raises important ethical questions, Read the full article…

Socioeconomic factors and mental health: past and present (Special Issue CfP, Palgrave Communications)

Palgrave Communications is an open access journal published by Palgrave Macmillan dedicated to publishing high quality original research across all areas of the humanities and social sciences. Article proposals and full submissions are now being sought for this special issue. This article collection, edited by Professor Matthew Smith and Dr Lucas Richert (University of Strathclyde), will examine how the relationship Read the full article…

Medical Humanities, Social Sciences, and the Environment Conference (CfP, Harvard University, 29-30 September 2017)

In the present age of the Anthropocene, the extraordinary transformations of Earth’s climate are changing the biophysical conditions involved in global food production, emerging epidemics and natural disasters. There is growing concern that global environmental change will have significant adverse impacts on global patterns of disease and mortality over the next century. Responses to recent Read the full article…

Monitoring the Self: Negotiating Technologies of Health, Identity and Governance (CfP, Helsinki, 8–10 November 2017)

This conference is organized by the Nordic Network Gender Body Health, in collaboration with Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies (University of Helsinki). It is funded by the Joint Committee for Nordic Research Councils in the Humanities and Social Sciences (NOS-HS). The keynote speaker will be Professor Deborah Lupton, University of Canberra, Australia. The twenty-first century Read the full article…

New Book: Portraits of Violence by Suzannah Biernoff

Portraits of Violence: War and the Aesthetics of Disfigurement is a new book by Suzannah Biernoff which investigates the artistic, medical, and journalistic responses to facial injury in WWI. Portraits of Violence explores the image and idea of facial disfigurement in one of its most troubling modern formations, as a symbol and consequence of war. Read the full article…

Call for Review: ‘Theatre for Children in Hospital: The Gift of Compassion’ by Persephone Sextou.

We are delighted to offer Theatre for Children in Hospital: The Gift of Compassion (Sextou, 2016) for review. Whilst expressions of interest are welcome from across the medical humanities, this book would be of particular interest to a reviewer with experience and expertise in applied theatre and performance, drama therapy, or child health. Further information about the themes under study Read the full article…

Call for Review: ‘Children as Caregivers: The Global Fight against Tuberculosis and HIV in Zambia’ by Jean Hunleth.

We are looking for a social scientist to review Children as Caregivers: The Global Fight against Tuberculosis and HIV in Zambia (Hunleth, 2016). Further information about the themes under study can be found at Rutgers University Press.  In Zambia, due to the rise of tuberculosis and the closely connected HIV epidemic, a large number of children have experienced the illness Read the full article…

‘AIDS and Masculinity in the African City: Privilege, Inequality, and Modern Manhood’ reviewed by Fredrick Nyman.

‘AIDS and Masculinity in the African City: Privilege, Inequality, and Modern Manhood’ by Robert Wyrod (University of California Press, 2016).  AIDS and Masculinity in the African City is based on a decade of ethnographic research in an urban slum community in Kampala, Uganda, and examines how the AIDS crisis has come to shape and shift Read the full article…

‘The Good Death: An exploration of dying in America’ reviewed by Caroline Pearce.

‘The Good Death: An exploration of dying in America’ by Ann Neumann (Beacon Press, 2016). Is it possible to have a ‘good’ death? And if so what might constitute a ‘good death’? In her book — The Good Death: An exploration of dying in America — writer and journalist Ann Neumann addresses questions familiar to Read the full article…

University of Edinburgh Chancellor’s Fellowships in Biomedicine, Self and Society (Jobs, deadline 02 May 2017)

The University of Edinburgh’s Medical and Law Schools, as well as the School of Social and Political Science, are embarking on a new research programme in Biomedicine, Self and Society. The university has invested in four tenure-track Chancellor’s Fellowships to support this work. Two have been appointed, with the additional posts now advertised. Please follow Read the full article…

Augmenting the Body: Work and the Posthuman (Seminar, Leeds, 27 April 2017)

Augmenting the Body is an interdisciplinary medical humanities project based at the University of Leeds, exploring questions of disability, bodily extensions, care and the posthuman. Work and the Posthuman is the fourth seminar to be presented in the Sadler Seminar Series. This series aims to explore the ways cultural and theoretical ideas of embodiment meet the practicalities Read the full article…