Pain in the medical humanities: A special edition collection

Pain in the medical humanities: A special edition collection. Edited by Ben Kasstan with Angela Woods; Centre for Medical Humanities, Durham University. Following our call for contributions, we are pleased to present a special edition collection on pain as a field of enquiry in the medical humanities. Our international and interdisciplinary contributors have generously shared Read the full article…

AMH 2015 ‘Dangerous Currents’ (Annual Conference, Dartington Hall, 23-25 June 2015)

In collaboration with Falmouth University and Creating Space Canada THE ASSOCIATION FOR MEDICAL HUMANITIES (AMH) ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2015 Dartington Hall Tues 23rd/ Wed 24th/ Thurs 25th June 2015 Dangerous Currents: risk & regulation at the interface of medicine & the arts Call for presentation proposals | Opening Keynote | Draft Programme Keynote conversations: Alphonso Lingis & Adrian Read the full article…

Job Opportunity: Durham Project Manager for the Life of Breath Project

Project Manager: The Life of Breath The Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH) at Durham University is looking to appoint a Project Manager to for the Life of Breath, a five-year research project supported by a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Award in the Medical Humanities. The ‘Life of Breath’ (LoB) is based in Durham University and Read the full article…

Announcing Working Knowledge: Practical Resources for Interdisciplinary Research

Interdisciplinary research: intermittently theorised, frequently funded, increasingly valorised. But how is it actually done? In order to explore answers to this question, and in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust and Durham’s Centre for Medical Humanities, Hearing the Voice has created Working Knowledge. Working Knowledge is a collection of Project Shorts: short, accessible introductions to the practical ins and outs of interdisciplinary research. Covering everything from Read the full article…

Postdoctoral Research Assistant, History of Medicine (Life of Breath) University of Bristol

Postdoctoral Research Assistant, History of Medicine (Life of Breath) based in the Department of Philosophy, Bristol University The Life of Breath project proposes that breathing and breathlessness can only be understood fully by drawing not only on physiological and pathological information, but also on cultural, historical and phenomenological sources. The key goal of the project Read the full article…

Introducing Chalkie’s Demon Diary: Mike White’s occasional rants & reflections during the progress of his illness

On 3/2/15 it gets written that ‘Chalkie’ is Mike White, erstwhile arts and health agent for the Centre for Medical Humanities at Durham University and abiding research fellow of St. Chad’s College. He has also been to some degree responsible for delivering the Angel of the North to Tyneside and for steering the development of Read the full article…

‘The Life of Breath’ and what it means to breath

The recently published ‘2014 Annual Review of the Wellcome Trust’ highlights the ‘The Life of Breath’, a recent Medical Humanities Joint Investigator Award. Joint Investigators Professor Jane McNaughton at Durham University and Professor Havi Carel at the University of Bristol were awarded funds made available by the Wellcome’s expanded remit within the health-related humanities and social science. As outlined on page Read the full article…

Durham University’s Interdisciplinary Doctoral Training Programme in Visual Culture

Readers of the CMH blog will be interested to note the launch of Durham University’s Interdisciplinary Training Programme in Visual Culture. This new Leverhulme-funded training scheme, headed by the Centre for Visual Art and Culture (CVAC), will run for five years, with intakes in 2015, 16 and 17. Applications may now be made for the first Read the full article…

Beatings with a Carrot – Mike White on Arts and Diversity

Mike White, CMH Arts in Health Correspondent, writes: It has been the Arts Council’s misfortune that in the past it has interpreted ‘diversity’ as culture’s prerogative to go off in all directions, leaving it to mediate successive governments’ melting pot metaphors of an inclusive multi-racial Britain. But recently in a sharp policy announcement that is Read the full article…

Think-Tanks and the Governance of Science: Guest Post by Martyn Pickersgill & Emilie Cloatre

Think-tanks play a key role in policy today. Yet, for scholars who are concerned with the dynamics within and between law and science, the place and impact of such organisations are often over-looked. To begin to remedy this, we held an event titled ‘Regulating Bioscience: Between the Ivory Tower and the Policy Room’ on the Read the full article…

Breathless in Cambridge: the Breathlessness Research Interest Group (BRIG) Conference 2014

Jane Macnaughton, Professor of Medical Humanities and Joint Senior Investigator on  Life Of Breath, writes: Getting going with the Life of Breath project has been a real revelation for me as someone who is committed to critically engaged medical humanities. It has always been a bit of a struggle to get clinicians interested in what Read the full article…

The Pathology of BODY WORLDS Vital

Fusing art and science engagement to explore the pathology of Von Hagens plastinates. By Rachael Allen Blog address BODY WORLDS Vital made its UK debut at Newcastle’s Centre For Life this year, displaying Dr Gunther Von Hagen’s plastinated human bodies exploring the physiology of human health and wellness. As a visual artist and researcher of Read the full article…

What is the New Generations Programme?

Emerging humanities researchers are increasingly engaging with interdisciplinary research but lack contexts in which to learn and experience how it is done. Durham University’s Centre for Medical Humanities, funded by the AHRC in collaboration with the Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research and Wellcome Trust introduces the New Generations Programme. This unique programme aims to Read the full article…

Medical Humanities in Africa – A Conference Review by Megan Wainwright

Megan Wainwright writes: ‘Medical Humanities in Africa…’ What are they? Who does them? What should they be? These were some of the overarching questions that framed a vibrant two-day conference at the idyllic Monkey Valley Resort in Noordhoek, South Africa (see photo!). Having only arrived in Cape Town five months ago it was a huge Read the full article…

Painting Portraits: A Review

William Viney writes: There’s an old West Country joke of which I’ve grown fond: a Booker Prize winning novelist and a professor of clinical neurophysiology walk into a museum. There, they speak about faces, trauma, compassion, art, writing, experiment, and the First World War and, at the end, they agree they’re onto a good thing.As Read the full article…

Neuroscience and Social Science: Experimental Imaginations

This podcast was developed through Pod Academy – an open access podcasting initiative based in London. It features CMH’s Felicity Callard, the KCL-based sociologist Des Fitzgerald, and William Viney. This podcast is about the relations between the social sciences and the neurosciences, and what it might mean to do interdisciplinary work between these areas. Des Read the full article…

‘Sleep / Agency / Activity’ Roundtable Discussion, Durham University, 8th May 2014 – Review

Patrick Levy, Philosophy PhD Candidate at Sussex University, writes: There is a certain degree of irony in a student of the philosophy of sleep sacrificing a substantial slice of sleep in order to attend a workshop on, amongst other things, sleep. With varying degrees of sleep deprivation (confessions of such abounded throughout the day) those Read the full article…

Fiction as Therapy: Towards a Neo-Phenomenological Theory of the Novel

Re-blogged from Research English at Durham:In the first lecture of a new British Academy series on The Novel in English, Professor Patricia Waugh reflects upon the recent rise of institutions such as the Reader Organisation, which encourages shared reading in therapeutic contexts such as hospitals and prisons. Taking this observation as a starting point, Waugh suggests that in recent years the Read the full article…

2014 UK Blog Awards: Centre for Medical Humanities Blog ‘highly commended’ in Health (Organisation) category

Felicity Callard writes:   We are delighted to have heard that our Centre for Medical Humanities blog has been ‘Highly Commended’ at the 2014 UK Blog Awards in the Health (Organisation) category.   This means that the CMH blog is one of the top three organisational health blogs in the UK (no mean feat, given that we are Read the full article…

Bodies in Formation: An Ethnography of Anatomy and Surgical Education – reviewed by Chris Howe

‘Bodies in Formation: An Ethnography of Anatomy and Surgical Education’ by Rachel Prentice (Duke University Press, 2012). So why has Rachel Prentice chosen to write about surgery – what is essentially described as a ‘body-contact sport’ (p.6)?  It is precisely the physical nature of surgery that lends itself so well to the analysis of embodied Read the full article…

First Hub Residency at Wellcome Collection to be led by CMH staff member Felicity Callard with CMH Affiliate Charles Fernyhough in Core Team

The Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH) is delighted to announce that first two-year £1m residency of The Hub at Wellcome Collection will be led by Dr Felicity Callard (Senior Lecturer in CMH and the Department of Geography), with Prof Charles Fernyhough (CMH Affiliate) as one of the core team (along with Claudia Hammond, Dr Daniel Read the full article…

Looking for Wonder – Caspar Henderson

At the beginning of Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark, the explorers cross an ocean guided by a chart that is entirely blank.Wonder is probably less elusive than the Snark, whether Boojum or no. Virtually all of us report experiences of it.  But what is it, and where is it? Martyn Evans, author of Read the full article…

The Life of Breath : a new project on breathlessness and COPD

Durham University Centre for Medical Humanities is delighted to announce that we will be hosting a new project jointly with the University of Bristol from October 2014.  The project is called ‘The Life of Breath’ and it is the result of a successful joint Senior Investigator Award application to the Wellcome Trust by Jane Macnaughton (Durham) Read the full article…

Jane Macnaughton – End Game Scenarios for Smoking in New Zealand

Jane Macnaughton writes: New Zealand’s South Island is a beautiful and unexpected place.  You can find yourself in a tiny village hall listening to a rather good folk duo and sitting right next to a Booker prize winning writer. Andrew Russell, co-convenor of the WRI Smoking Special Interest Group, and I are in New Zealand Read the full article…

Whistle While You Work (For Nothing): Positive Affect as Coercive Strategy – The Case of Workfare

In this post, Lynne Friedli and Robert Stearn look at the role of  psychological coercion, notably through the imposition of positive affect,  in UK Government workfare programmes. There has been little or no debate about the recruitment of psychology/psychologists into monitoring,  modifying and/or punishing  people who claim social security benefits. This silence raises important ethical questions, Read the full article…

‘A question of trust: Medical humanities can help ease the pain’ by Sandra G. Weems

‘A question of trust: Medical humanities can help ease the pain’ – a contribution to our special edition collection of pain in the medical humanities, by Sandra G. Weems In only the second semester of graduate school, my experience of chronic pain caused me to doubt everything: the value of my literary studies, the validity of my academic aspirations, Read the full article…

‘Pain: From Chalkie’s demon diary’ by Mike White

‘Pain: From Chalkie’s demon diary’ – a contribution to our special edition collection of pain in the medical humanities, by Mike White Last November I was travelling round Australia doing presentations and media interviews about arts in health and making big plans. I have been to Hell and back since then. When I, got home I started Read the full article…

Patient and Public Involvement in Research: Theory and Practice (Kingston University and St George’s, University of London, Friday 12th June 2015)

The Centre for Public Engagement at the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education (Kingston University and St George’s, University of London) are running a series of courses on patient and public involvement in research. This course is designed primarily for researchers who either have an upcoming research project which requires PPI and/or researchers who Read the full article…

‘The Diseases, Health Risks and Phobias of Modern and Fashionable Living: Victorian Perspectives’ (Friday, 8 May 2015, 4.00 – 6.30pm, Newcastle University )

A Workshop funded by the Leverhulme Trust Room 3.38 ARMB (Armstrong Building), Newcastle University Speakers: Professor Sally Shuttleworth (University of Oxford), ‘Fears and Phobias in Victorian Culture’. Sally Shuttleworth, is Professor in the Faculty of English Language and Literature, St Anne’s College, University of Oxford, and PI of the ERC funded ‘Diseases of Modern Life: Read the full article…

‘The divided subject of chronic pain: I don’t want pain/am in danger’ a second contribution by Seamus Barker

‘The divided subject of chronic pain: I don’t want pain/am in danger’ – a contribution to our special edition collection of pain in the medical humanities, by Seamus Barker Chronic pain is typically defined as pain that persists for longer than three months. In the previous post, ‘What is Pain?’, I suggested that pain corresponds to Read the full article…

‘What is pain? (Danger is painful)’ a contribution by Seamus Barker

‘What is pain? (Danger is painful)’ – a contribution to our special edition collection of pain in the medical humanities, by Seamus Barker The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as, ‘an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage’, but advances in Read the full article…

Hidden Persuaders: New project website on ‘brainwashing’ in the Cold War

“Hidden Persuaders” is a project enabled by a Senior Investigator Award to Professor Daniel Pick from The Wellcome Trust. The project examines ‘brainwashing’ in the Cold War for the roles, real and imagined, played by psychologists, psychiatrists and psychoanalysts. The project asks how these disciplines pictured tyranny and freedom of mind, were drawn into ‘psy warfare’ and Read the full article…

The Female Suffering Body: Illness and Disability in Modern Arabic Literature by Abir Hamdar

A new book by Abir Hamdar (ISBN: 978-0-8156-3365-5, Publisher: Syracuse University Press) Although there is a history of rich, complex, and variegated representations of female illness in Western literature over the last two centuries, the sick female body has traditionally remained outside the Arab literary imagination. Hamdar takes on this historical absence in The Female Read the full article…

Reproducing the Environment (CfP, American Anthropological Association Annual Conference Denver CO, Nov 18-22, 2015)

Organizers: Dr. Katie Dow and Dr. Janelle Lamoreaux Research Group in Reproductive Sociology, University of Cambridge In what ways is the environment a context for thinking about reproduction, and reproduction a context for thinking about the environment? Through what overlapping idioms, analogies, and examples are reproduction and the environment connected? This panel aims to encourage Read the full article…